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Your success requires attorneys with in-depth knowledge and experience in this complex ever-changing field. We practice solely immigration law to ensure that you get the best representation possible in a life situation where the stakes are high. Our attorneys have over 100 years of combined experience in this field and we are committed to providing you with skilled and effective comprehensive advocacy.

Gibbs Houston Pauw has a long history of leadership service with the American Immigration Lawyers Association and non-profit organizations. We make collaborative efforts and continuously strive to further the rights of immigrant communities.

Immigrants and Their Advocates File Class Action Lawsuit Against USCIS and DHS for Unlawful Delays in Adjudicating Applications for Employment Authorization

Seattle, WA – Last Friday, three immigrants and two immigration service providers filed a nationwide class action lawsuit here in Seattle against U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for unlawfully delaying the adjudication of their applications for employment authorization. Filed by the American Immigration Council, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Gibbs Houston Pauw, Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C., and Van der Hout, Brigagliano & Nightingale, LLP, the complaint alleges that USCIS’s policies and practices of failing to timely adjudicate applications for employment authorization documents (EADs) and failing to issue interim employment authorization, violate the governing regulations and the Administrative Procedure Act.

By regulation, USCIS must either adjudicate EAD applications within a fixed time period or issue interim employment authorization. Yet, USCIS regularly fails to do either, leaving immigrants in a precarious position, unable to work legally and at risk of losing their jobs, related benefits and, in some states, their driver’s licenses. At a recent meeting with AILA members, USCIS representatives indicated that “USCIS no longer produces interim EADs.” Plaintiffs seek the Court’s intervention to compel USCIS to adjudicate EAD applications within the time period mandated by the regulations or, if the regulatory time period has expired, issue interim employment authorization.

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